No time to blog? Consider Tweeting or Tumbling.

One problem that many fledgling bloggers encounter is finding time in the day to create a quality blog post.  Of course, the definition of what makes a blog post a ‘quality’ one is pretty subject to interpretation, but many people set fairly high standards for themselves.  If you’d like to start building out your presence on the web, by yourself or with a class, but don’t want to commit too much time to the task, then consider the world of microblogging.

Twitter is a site that I have spoken of with love on many an occasion.  It provides you with 140 characters to share what you’re doing right now.  They key ingredient to making Twitter stick though, is to build up a network of friends.  Sometimes your friends may be doing nothing more than eating a bagel, but other times they’re sharing fantastic classroom resources, presentation ideas, and professional development opportunities you might never hear about otherwise.  And if you need a few friends to kick things off, you can always start with Hall, Scott, Jannita, me, and of course the DEN itself!  Then look through the list of faces in the right sidebar to find other people to connect with.  Plenty of STAR Discovery Educators are using it and sharing every day.

The other microblogging site I thought I’d mention is Tumblr.   Essentially it’s a blogging engine that is made to encourage tiny little short blog posts, videos, images, and links.  A three word tumblr post is not unusual at all.  Got something to share, but not much time to do it?  Tumblr was created for your exact situation. 

Another use of Tumblr has started to evolve though.  It really fascinates me how many people are using it to aggregate their ‘lifestream’.  Since you can have it bring in RSS feeds automatically, you could use it as a central repository for your Flickr photos, del.icio.us bookmarks, blog posts, tweets from Twitter, videos from YouTube and so on.  Your entire online life in one central location.

Comments

  1. Hall Davidson

    Good thought! I would have responded sooned but I had to take the time to blog :)

  2. Janetta Garton

    Thanks for sharing your twitter names. I just started last week and have participated in a WOW podcast and contributed to Cable in the Classroom publication as a result of connections made in twitter. I’m a reluctant participant slowly being convinced it is worth the effort.

  3. Riptide Furse

    OK so I work in a district that is moving from the forefront of EdTech to the Dark Ages due to censorship. They have blocked Twitter. I believe I can still post through IM. Is there a way to still keep up with the people I am following?

  4. Heather Sullivan- NJ DEN LC

    Anyone have ideas for specific/targeted uses for twitter & students- you know, more than just putting a twitter link on our webpage for “fun”? Maybe for some kind of threaded discussion for a specific question?

  5. Lee Kolbert

    Hey, guys! I’m just now getting my “Twit” on! I’m Teacha Kidd in Twitter (just like in 2nd Life).

    Heather,
    You ask a great question. I guess first you will ALL have to sign up with Twitter and choose to “follow” each other. That could be quite a task, but well worth the time if used well. I can imagine posting a quick question. For example, “Give 3 words that describe the evolution of the character, AnneMarie, in “Number The Stars?” Again, I’m very new to Twitter and would love to hear from others with regard to your question.

    Lee

  6. Elaine Plybon - Texas and SL LC

    Heather,

    If my district weren’t in the dark ages like Rip’s is, I would have a portion of the A-layer of my curriculum include establishing some kind of collaboration with a science student in another classroom. The DEN is an excellent source for teachers who you can trust and who can get your students connected with theirs!

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