A Little Bit of Hollywood – Past, Present, Future

title2.pngLots of different kinds of media in the first post of 2008. It will be a digital year! Numerologically, if you add the “2” to the “8” in 2008 you get all zeros and ones. Close enough. First, Young Hollywood: If you didn’t see Joe Brennan’s post, it still isn’t too late to judge the student media work from Irvine, Texas. Go here and take a gander. I LOVE student media like this. It’s a project from Elaine Plybon, a great DEN member whose picture was almost a permanent fixture on the DEN site. You still have until Jan. 7, unless they extend the deadline. Another idea worth a peek is the Student AUP videos from Scott County, Kentucky,scslogo.jpg courtesy of Jeanne Biddle. These Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) videos are a terrific way to bring the point home to kids of every grade level: put them in a video! And if “surfing” is involved, both metaphorically and real, you know you’ve grabbed the kids (I’m referring to the K-3 Training video). If you want some tips on chromakeying students into a curling wave using Mac’s Leopard OS, check out Brennan’s latest post. joetoup2.jpgWhile you’re there, find the visual answer to the vital male question “when does real hair look like a toupee, instead of vice versa? ” Optical illusion since Joe has more hair than my college student kid. Joe made it into David Warlick’s 2007 Pictorial Review but he’s too modest to mention it. Myself, I made it into a Warlick podcast so I’m happy, even though he said I lived in Beverly Hills, not Hollywood. A digital difference of many zeros and ones in the real estate…Speaking of Hollywood, the terrific windstorm we had last week knocked down a 170-foot tree that almost took out the original Hollywoodland office. The famous Hollywood sign originally read “Hollywoodland” as part of a 1920’s real estate development. Last century’s big windstorm blew off the “H” and it was repaired with its current name in 1949. Los Angeles Times story and pictures here. The true New Hollywood is in today’s classrooms. A 2007 survey from Deliotte & Touche reveals that Millennials (age 13-24) generate–and consume–the most user-generated content. A staggering 58% create personal content in a typical week2007-population.png and even more, 71% regularly consume it. This generation “will define the future of media” and the big issues for media industries in this “media democracy” are the impact on “ad dollars, what devices need to be developed, and how internal operations need to be realigned”. Makes me happy to be at Discovery, which gets it. Note: When Millennials IM, the most common topic is favorite television shows . Old media: meet new media. Also, television is driving traffic to websites, second only to word of mouth. Big takeaway: Watch your cellphone! 62% of Millennials think of their phone as a source of entcellphone.pngertainment. Just behind, 25-41 year-olds 47% see their cells that way–up from 29% just a year ago. Watch for cool stuff in these pages this year, including Discovery Mobile. How about a made for mobile series like this one: Earth Grooves, 6 4-minute episodes of music and visuals from nature. Produced by Christopher Wojcik. Stay tuned, boomers. So from ‘Hollywood students,’ Hollywood blowhards, and Hollywood in your pocket, that’s the end of the first post of 2008. I look forward to your comments.

Census image from deloitte.com at link provided above.

Comments

  1. Joe Brennan

    As soon as I hit publish on that blog post and the picture, I knew it was just a matter of time before Dembo, Jakes, Warlick or Davidson would jump on it. And the winner is Hall! Guess I’ll have to get that toupee re-coiffed before my end of the month appearances in Florida. And continuing on with Hall’s Hollywood theme, don’t forget AFI’s ScreenNation due in early ’08 (http:www.afi.edu/screennation).

  2. Hall Davidson

    Glad to beat the Tech Trio at something. Let it be know that Joe has plenty of his own hair and I would trade with him any day. And Southern California would kill for that humidity.

  3. Remi

    This generation “will define the future of media” and the big issues for media industries in this “media democracy” are the impact on “ad dollars, what devices need to be developed, and how internal operations need to be realigned”.

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