heasulli's daily diigo bookmarks 05/01/2008

  • tags: edtech

    • Blogging helps encourage teen writing
      Survey reveals that student bloggers are more prolific and appreciate the value of writing more than their peers
    • Buried beneath the alarm of writing “purists,” however, was a promising finding with equally important implications for schools: Blogging is helping many teens become more prolific writers.
    • The survey, conducted by the Pew Internet and American Life Project with support from the College Board and its National Commission on Writing,
    • Forty-seven percent of teen bloggers write outside of school for personal reasons several times a week or more, compared with 33 percent of teens without blogs. Sixty-five percent of teen bloggers believe that writing is essential to later success in life; 53 percent of non-bloggers say the same thing.
  • tags: edtech

    • Eligible applicants are required to be nonprofit 501(c)(3) history organizations such as a museum, historical society, preservation organization, historic site, library, archive, or other history organization;
    • Eligible applicants must submit the application on behalf of their partner school(s) or educational organization(s) as the school(s) or educational organization(s) are not eligible to be the applicant; and
    • Applicants must design a project in partnership with a local school(s) or youth group(s). To view descriptions of Save Our History projects funded in 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007 please visit http://www.saveourhistory.com.
    • 1. Proposed projects must focus on exploring and preserving a significant aspect of community history.
    • 2. Proposed projects must raise awareness among students and community members about the significance of their local heritage and the importance of preserving it.
    • 3. Proposed projects must include a tangible resource that captures students’ effort to learn about and preserve their local history in a unique, creative way.
  • tags: edtech

  • tags: edtech

  • tags: edtech

    • A key person behind the “$100 laptop” for schoolchildren has left the project as the organization overhauls its operations and prepares to tweak its open-source approach by welcoming Microsoft Corp.’s Windows.
    • Then last week, Bender left the group entirely. That marked a third high-profile departure from OLPC. In addition to Krstic, Mary Lou Jepsen, who had been chief technology officer, left in December.
    • But Bender already has new plans: to launch an independent effort to further the development of the XOs’ homegrown software, known as Sugar, and get it to run on Linux computers other than XOs.
  • tags: edtech

  • tags: edtech

  • tags: edtech

  • tags: edtech

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