Overheard at Michigan Virtual University’s Online Learning Symposium

From Steve Megley, Deputy Director of Ed Tech, US Department of Education:

  • “Assessment can be done THROUGH the act of learning.  It’s crazy to give tests and expect kids to do well just to make the teacher’s day.”
  • “Education needs structural change, and we must find the spaces for the changes.  We cannot just add it to the gaps in the current system.  It will involve risks, and will probably be done in the hours outside of the traditional school day.”
  • “The biggest factor that leads to increased student achievement is to have highly effective instructors in classrooms.  Highly connected teachers can improve their classroom effectiveness.  Connect those who are motivationally aligned.”
  • “Using Wikipedia is a life skill.  Do not block it.”
  • “Keeping educators current is a problem. I don’t have a solution to this problem, but it might be a good idea to look at health care and  find out how medical professionals keep current.”

From Milton Chen, Senior Fellow and Executive Director Emeritus at The George Lucas Educational Foundation:

  • “Innovation is the key to creating an education nation.”
  • “1:1 programs are weapons of mass instruction.”  All students need their own device.  The state of Maine provides laptops for every middle school student for $250/student/year.”
  • “Technology is only technology to those born before it.”
  • “Try asking other educators in your district these questions…. What is your definition of a great school? What would be the data indicators?”

From Richard Ferdig, Research Professor in the Research Center for Educational Technology at Kent State University:

  • “Online learning can only make a difference if the instruction changes.”
  • “Find ways to record exemplary practice.”
  • “Gaming and virtual worlds can greatly impact student learning.”

Michigan Virtual University’s Online Learning Symposium

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