How Might Technology Be an Asset?

How might all individual students be served if schools, families and communities were to strengthen a shared commitment directed toward the goal of: Schools should be places where all students can and do learn?

  • a student who was highly stimulated with language, social, emotional, nutritional and physical opportunity from ages of 0 to five,
  • a student who was not highly stimulated with language, social, emotional, nutritional and physical opportunity from ages of 0 to five,
  • a student of a racial or ethnic majority group,
  •  a special education student (any classification),
  • a high achieving or exceptionally talented (related to the subjects taught in) student,
  • a high achieving or exceptionally talented (whose demonstrated or potential talents and achievements are not related to the subjects taught in school) student,
  • an average achieving (related to the subjects taught in) student,
  • an average achieving (whose demonstrated or potential talents and achievements are not related to the subjects taught in school) student,
  • a below average achieving (related to the subjects taught in) student,
  • a below average achieving  (whose demonstrated or potential talents and achievements are not related to the subjects taught in school) student,
  • a student living in poverty,
  • a student living above poverty,
  • a student living in wealth,
  • a student living with a family in crisis of: homelessness, transient living conditions, family member addiction, family member incarcerated or on parole, parents separating or divorcing, parent or parents out of work, and/or death of a family member,
  • a student living with his or her medical problem, such as: HIV, cancer, diabetes, asthma . . .,
  •  a student who is a legal or not document immigrant,
  •  a non English speaking student,
  •    a student whose sexual identity is not accepted by others,
  •    a student who is involved in the use of mind altering substances, and
  •    a student who is socially isolated”

Note: This list is not presented with any intention of placing the individual situations of students in any particular order nor is this list intended to be a complete or comprehensive list.

Now stop and think about how technology might be an asset (among other assets) for schools, families and communities who are committed to all kids learning. Then let’s get to work!  The kids are worth it!

Note: This Book: School. Family and Community Partnerships by Joyce L. Epstein is a valuable resource.

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