Lively Lessons: Post-Viewing Activity (Part 3)

This week, we share three Lively Lessons in three days to prepare for the Meet Students Who Are Changing the World student panel discussion, taking place Thursday, January 21, at 1 PM ET.

Today’s lesson features a process art project to direct student thinking about their own values and motivations.  Through collage-making, students represent their identity and self with images, objects, and text.  After personal reflection, students consider how to represent those values symbolically, with the end result secondary to the experience.

Can’t attend Meet Students Who Are Changing the World? Register and be alerted when the archive is available. Not the right fit for your classroom? Consider modifying these ideas for use with other content.


VanGough_frame

After viewing the Meet Students Who Are Changing the World student panel discussion, focus student thinking on what they can do to make a difference. Help students visualize what’s important to them by creating a collage depicting what inspires, is valued by, or stirs interest in your students.

 

Chagall_frameInstruct students that they will be creating self-portrait. However, unlike other portraits, this self-portrait will represent what’s on the inside, such as personal ideas, values, sources of inspiration, rather than what’s on the outside, like accuracy of hair or eye color.

 

Remind students that they’ve just heard from some panelists who were inspired to take action for a cause that was meaningful to them. Ask students to consider what is most important to them. For additional structure or prompt, share that many ideas fall into the categories below, and have students choose three categories and identify specific issues that they find important or personally value.

 

Cassat_frame

  • Environment (e.g., recycling, biodiversity)
  • Health (e.g., cancer research, Alzheimer’s)
  • Self (e.g., leading a healthy lifestyle, music, family)
  • Education (e.g., poetry, robotics, art)
  • Community (e.g., homelessness, bullying)

 

Cezanne_frameHave students find objects, images, or words that represent the ideas that they value. They may choose to bring objects from home, cut images from magazines, or print digital images from a source like Discovery Education. Then, using scissors, glue, paint and more, have students arrange the materials into their self-portrait.

Flexible Grouping

Students interview one another about what is important to them, then create portraits of their peers.

Modifications

Have students upload an image of their collage into Discovery Education Board Builder, creating a digital poster that describes their collage material selections and symbolic representations.

Discovery Education Resources

Collage (video segment)

Self-Portrait by Frida Kahlo (image)

Self-Portrait by Vincent van Gogh (image)

Self-Portrait by Marc Chagall (image)

Self-Portrait by Mary Cassatt (image)

Self-Portrait by Paul Cezanne (image)

Authors

Related posts

*

 

Top