DEN Trend Report: 3/22/2017

Looking to learn more about what’s trending in education?!? Here’s a recap of this week’s news. Let us know what you think about this week’s news in the comments below.

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EdTech Digest Awards Program 2017 – Finalists

Any education company is, by the era in which we now live, an edtech company. And today, any educator, learner, or leader is at least a nascent technologist. Billions of dollars have been invested in this future, and we will no doubt invest billions more. Whatever the immediate figures, because of the integral nature of education to humanity’s ultimate survival, the long-term trend will only be up. In honoring cool tools, inspiring leaders, and innovative trendsetters in education, we do so with a sense of excitement, but also a sense of responsibility. Dream-to-reality makers are awesome to behold. But the stakes are high because these honorees are shaping our future. Perhaps more so than in any other sector, in education there are mission-driven companies and there are purpose-driven people. For what mission, and for what purposes committed individuals or dedicated groups of people help advance the rest of us, is what we honor and celebrate here. And with that, here’s to the innovators, leaders, and trendsetters shining bright in one of the greatest fields of human endeavor. And the honorees are:

Eight Ways Parents Can Develop Global Competence at Home
By Guest Blogger Jennifer Ghymn.

Global education begins at home, says parent and concerned global citizen

Many people would agree: parenting is one of the hardest jobs in the world. It’s an endless 24/7 cycle that requires attention, maturity, resourcefulness, and patience. For some of us, learning the ABCs, the 50 states, and multiplication tables is enough to call it a day when it comes to schooling. However, the lessons of life and everyday situations persist beyond the classroom. Ultimately, it’s the parent’s responsibility to talk about what’s happening in the news, to introduce new concepts, to teach diversity, and to broaden one’s outlook on the world. Parents must take it upon themselves to raise global citizens.

EdTech: The Secret Weapon
By Na’ama Y. Rosenberg
March 9, 2017

The United States National Academies has emphasized the need for enhanced STEM education in the United States. Its top three recommendations were to:

  • Increase America’s talent pool by improving K–12 science and mathematics education
  • Strengthen the skills of teachers through additional training in science, mathematics, and technology
  • Enlarge the pipeline of students prepared to enter college and graduate with STEM degrees

As Education Goes Digital, Some Parents Are Left Behind
(EdSurge)
By Jenny Abamu

From New York City to Chattanooga, district leaders around the United States have stories to tell about the instructional technologies they are introducing in schools. Many are training educators to teach students computer science, and other STEM subjects through new technology. And although leaders agree that parent engagement is an important part of student success, their innovation plans often leave them out—particularly those in low-income communities.

Easy Digital Tools for Modeling in the Science Classroom
(KQED Learning)
By Albert Padilla

The technique of modeling is one of the focal points of the Next Generation Science Standards, so I’ve been looking for more opportunities for my 10th and 11th grade chemistry students to create their own models. I’ve found two programs that are great for engaging students and allowing me to record their models digitally.

For a recent activity about bonds, I begin using Pear Deck. Pear Deck is slide presentation software that allows students to join and respond in real time with text responses, drawings, and other interactive strategies that I can see immediately – making checking for understanding easy and powerful.  I first ask students to draw what they think a sodium and a chlorine atom would look like. (We’d covered the periodic table already and they should have some idea of how to get started.)

15 Ideas to Ensure That Project Based Learning is Grounded in Content and Standards
(Tech&Learning)
By Michael Gorman

It is important that Project Based Learning provides students with wonderful opportunities that allow them to take part in a culture focused on rich activities and experiences. It promotes those important 21st-century skills while balancing this acquisition with important content knowledge and standards. The lessons and activities are intentional, aligned, and mapped to curricular standards. The standards and skills are constantly assessed in a variety of ways involving numerous stakeholders.  Most of all, there is an alignment between standards, skills, and assessment. By incorporating these indicators teachers are ensured that they have provided a project process that is built on standards and proper skill acquisition. The four areas that serve as indicators for grounding PBL in standards are below.

  • Curricular Content and Standards
  • 21st Century Skills
  • Formative and Summative Assessment
  • Intentional and Aligned

Groundbreaking school blends high school and college together
(eSchool News)
By Dave Knoche

The way we prepare students for the future is beginning to change because our economy is undergoing a makeover. The Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce published a report stating that by 2020, 65 percent of our economy’s jobs will require post-secondary education or training beyond high school. That means that students without these post-secondary milestones will only be applicable for 35 percent of jobs. Because of this, it is important to create programs that encourage students to pursue post-secondary education.

However, a four-year degree may not be the right path for every student.

At Pikes Peak Early College (PPEC), we don’t exclusively encourage our students to pursue a four-year college degree. Because of this, we are able to attract different types of students from various backgrounds.

Response: What Teaching in the Year 2047 Might Look Like
(Education Week)
By Larry Ferlazzo

The new “question-of-the-week” is:

How will teaching and schools look different twenty-or-thirty years from now? Or will they?

Looking into our crystal balls and predicting the future can be a risky business.  However, we probably want to keep this quote in mind attributed to poet Lucille Clifton:

“We cannot create what we can’t imagine.”

So, in that spirit, this week we’ll consider this question…

What Do People Know About Excellent Teaching and Learning?
(Center for American Progress)
By Ulrich Boser

It’s a set of questions that nags just about every parent with school-age kids: Does their child’s teacher employ good instructional practices? What are educators doing to help their kid learn? Is the school using effective programs and approaches?

There’s a problem, though, because it turns out that most people do not have a robust sense of what effective teaching looks like. Indeed, most Americans believe various myths about the nature of teaching and learning, and large swaths of the public support instructional practices that are ineffective or even hurtful to learning.

Why One School Lives as Another Dies in the Same Building
(The New York Times)
By Kate Taylor

What is the distance between progress and failure?

At 1000 Teller Avenue in the South Bronx, it is two flights of stairs and a few points on the annual state exams — the gap between the New Millennium Business Academy Middle School, on the second floor, and Junior High School 145 Arturo Toscanini, on the fourth.

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5 Comments

  1. ??i lý Chevrolet said:

    I thinks it so great … Billions of dollars have been invested in this future, and we will no doubt invest billions more. Whatever the immediate figures, because of the integral nature of education to humanity’s ultimate survival, the long-term trend will only be up

  2. Ford Hà Thành said:

    “At Pikes Peak Early College (PPEC), we don’t exclusively encourage our students to pursue a four-year college degree. Because of this, we are able to attract different types of students from various backgrounds.”
    What a nice school management 🙂
    http://www.xeotoford.org/

  3. Hyundai Tr??ng Chinh said:

    There’s a problem, though, because it turns out that most people do not have a robust sense of what effective teaching looks like. Indeed, most Americans believe various myths about the nature of teaching and learning, and large swaths of the public support instructional practices that are ineffective or even hurtful to learning.
    http://www.hyundaitruongchinh.org/

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