DEN Trend Report: 12/19/17

Looking to learn more about what’s trending in education?!? Here’s a recap of this week’s news. Let us know what you think about this week’s news in the comments below.



Demand is growing for a strong STEM workforce. How can educators prepare today’s learners for tomorrow’s careers? (Learning First Alliance)
By Cindy Moss

Many of the most valuable jobs of tomorrow depend on STEM education happening in today’s classrooms.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics projects that by 2020, there will be 1.4 million IT jobs available but only 400,000 computer science graduates with the required skills to fill the positions. Companies continue to report their STEM jobs aren’t being filled, and human resources departments are not finding applicants with the necessary skills. STEM Connector data shows there will soon be 3 million vacant jobs because students entering the workforce are lacking STEM skills. The good news is that STEM education initiatives are on the rise across the country to meet this growing demand in the workforce.

5 Ways Parents Can Encourage STEM at Home (Patch)
By Erika Maya

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education is more important than ever. According to the site STEMconnector, by 2018, 8.65m workers will be needed for STEM-related jobs in the USA. STEM skills are necessary and at the heart of the 21st century’s job-driven economy. So how can you help encourage an interest in these fields with your child? Here are five simple tips to help your child in STEM learning outside of the classroom.

Create a STEM-friendly Home:

When Should Cybersecurity Education Start? Some Say Elementary School (Education Week)
By Sarah Schwartz

As reports of cyberattacks multiply—from national election-related hacking to school-level phishing scams—the need for trained high school and postsecondary graduates in the field is growing.

And increasingly, industry, governments, and educators are looking to introduce students to online security earlier in their K-12 careers, in the hope of encouraging their continued academic study of the topic and their awareness of careers in the field.

“If you’re in high school, it’s almost too late,” said Sheila Boyington, the president of Thinking Media, in a keynote address here on Monday at the NICE K-12 Cybersecurity Education Conference.

District of the year: Long Beach Unified School District (Education DIVE)
By Linda Jacobson

Stepping into one of the structures that make up the Cabrillo High School campus in Long Beach might leave one thinking they’ve entered the wrong government building. There’s a jury box, a witness chair and a judge’s bench flanked by the U.S. and California flags. The “Home of the Cabrillo Jaguars” blanket hanging on the wall is the only sign that this unique courtroom is part of a school.

Affiliated with the Los Angeles County Teen Court Diversion Program, the facility gives students in the Cabrillo Academy of Law and Justice (CAL-J) more than just a glimpse of the legal profession. They can serve on a jury, work as a bailiff or a clerk, and have access to internships — while still taking Advanced Placement (AP) courses that prepare them for college.

U.S. Students Comprehend Information Better Online than on Paper (US News)
By Lauren Camera

U.S. students are better at comprehending information online than on paper, results from a new exam suggest.

Fourth-grade students in the U.S. scored well above the international average in online reading on a test administered alongside the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study, also known as PIRLS, which measures reading comprehension among fourth-grade students.

Checkoff’s Discovery Education Partnership Brings Your Farm Story to Classrooms (Dairy Business)
By Roger Riddell

We know there is a growing trend among consumers wanting to know more about the source of their food and what it took to get it from your farms to their homes.

They are asking if you mistreat your cows and if you are doing the right things when it comes to managing the environment surrounding your farm.

What’s surprising is that some of the people asking these questions are still in elementary school.

Our consumer research shows that kids as young as the fifth grade are becoming aware of various social issues, including food production, and are forming their own opinions. Some of what they believe challenges the likelihood they will become lifelong dairy consumers.

Family’s Playlists’ the latest infusion of tech into parent-teacher communications (Education Dive)

Dive Brief:

  • An ongoing pilot program in which South Bronx Preparatory uses “Family Playlists” for personalized learning is boosting parents’ participation in their children’s learning, EdSource reports.
  • The pilot, by New York nonprofit PowerMyLearning, began in January 2016 with 100 students and with teachers receiving over 300 personal messages from families who were now more directly involved in their child’s learning — though there were reportedly no guarantees initially that the idea would work at the 95% free-or-reduced lunch school with a significant number of parents working multiple jobs or not native English speakers.
  • Under the “Family Playlist” model, educators create a two-part homework assignment each week or two that requires a student to sit down with a family member and teach them the lesson they’ve learned through a project, with the family member then answering a handful of questions about the student’s understanding of the concept.

My School’s Great, but American Education? Not so Much. New Poll on U.S. Attitudes Suggests Public Perception ‘in a State of Flux’. (The 74 Million)
by Kevin Mahnken

Americans remain as conflicted as ever on K-12 schooling and the proper role of the federal government in it, according to a new poll from the research and advocacy group EdChoice. Respondents generally saw the nation’s education system as being on the wrong course and were skeptical of the government’s capacity to correct it — but parents also gave high marks to their local schools and approved many federal education initiatives, such as those aimed at students with disabilities.

3 Ways to Reimagine Learning Spaces (eSchool News)
by Laura Ascione

As schools depart from traditional instructional methods and environments, some education leaders are discovering how a combination of blended learning and reimagined physical learning spaces can lead to better student engagement and achievement.

Redesigning physical learning spaces can lead to brain-friendly learning and encourage students to become more engaged.

And when learning spaces are flexible, they provide more modern learning experiences and meet various needs, such as small-group collaboration, large-group instruction, and individual study or review.


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