Spotlight On Strategies articles

SOS: Pause and Play

SOS: Pause and Play

Watching a video for academic reasons is very different than watching a video for entertainment. Just pressing the play button does not ensure that students will understand or learn. Students need to apply comprehension strategies to make sense of material they watch, in much the same way as they do when they read written text. Pause & Play works just like it sounds: you use both pause and play when sharing a video segment with your students. This simple yet powerful process directs students to focus on understanding the content presented by the video. It provides them with multiple opportunities to fix up and monitor their comprehension before they engage in discussion and synthesis of the material.

math students

Top Ten SOS to Develop Mathematical Thinking

Happy New Year! We hope you’ve had a relaxing Winter Break and are ready to embrace the second half of the school year. A new year brings opportunity to reflect, set goals and reimagine what learning looks like in our classrooms. Over the past months we’ve highlighted ways to use the Spotlight on Strategies series to activate learning and engage students. This month we’re shining the spotlight on using SOS to help students become strong and effective mathematical thinkers.

Woman with lens in front of eye

SOS: Eye Spy

Visual literacy is the ability to interpret and make sense of visual information we encounter, including but not limited to information found in photographs, drawings and paintings. According to the article “Reading Images: An Introduction to Visual Literacy,” by Melissa Thibault and David Walbert, “The visually literate viewer looks at an image carefully, critically, and with an eye for the intentions of the image’s creator.”

Students in a science classroom.

Top Ten SOS in Science Classrooms

The Spotlight on Strategies series is the perfect companion for science instruction. Budding scientists need opportunities to get hands-on through experimentation, analysis of experiment data, opportunities to synthesize multiple sources, and evaluate material they’re learning. The SOS provide creative and interactive ways to do all of these things!

SOS: 4 C’s

The 4 C’s Visible Thinking Routine (Connections, Challenges, Concepts, and Changes) was developed in Harvard’s Project Zero. This strategy is used to help students develop synthesizing and organizational skills. According to the authors, the 4 C’s are used to guide students to make connections, ask questions, identify key concepts, and contemplate changes/consider the application of what they’ve learned.