Tag Archives: Sos

SOS: LOL

SOS: LOL

The development of humor parallels Piaget’s stages of cognitive development. In the same way that physical play strengthens bodies, word play develops a child’s mind. To understand humor, a student must learn new things about words or logical relationships. Students of all ages expand their senses of humor as they recognize that the meaning of words can be ambiguous and that words and phrases may sound alike yet have different connotations. Jokes and riddles stimulate intellectual growth. (Chiasson, 2002) In this strategy, students will create a meme using images to help explain the joke or riddle or bring comprehension to the humor.

SOS: DIY Reader’s Theater

Reader’s Theater is a fun and accessible way to bring dramatic presentation into your classroom. This technique helps your students understand what they read, demonstrate reading fluency, and work collaboratively. In DIY Reader’s Theater, students are write their own scripts from different types of fiction or non-fiction reading passages.

SOS: Three Questions

This strategy allows students the opportunity to ask three questions, leading them into their own learning through deeper investigation. Introduced by Trace Dominguez at DENSI 2015, this strategy reinforces the concept that when students generate their own questions about a story, text, problem, or topic, it piques student interest and gives purpose for reading or research thus driving learning through inquiry.

Five Strategies for Developing Student Compassion in Core Instruction

Explore these curated strategies that promote kindness, compassion, and empathy from Discovery Education’s Spotlight on Strategies series, and learn more about “Discover Kindness in the Classroom” – a national partnership focusing on students’ social and emotional learning skills.

A Very Special SOS for #DENSI2016

The theme for this year’s DEN Summer Institute (DENSI) is JOY.  So what better way to celebrate our theme than with a special instructional strategy as part of our SOS series.  You can download the JOY SOS here. A very special thank you to Susan Bowdoin (@sbowdoin) who made this SOS even more useful and

SOS: Two Stars and A Wish

Numerous studies indicate that feedback is most effective when it is given immediately. Research indicates that individuals who are given immediate feedback show a significantly larger increase in performance than those who receive delayed feedback. James Pennebaker states that, “Students must be given access to information about their performance . . . At the broadest level, students need to know if they actually have mastered the material or not. Giving them information about the ways they are studying, reading, searching for information, or answering questions can be invaluable.”

SOS: Fold Draw Learn

“Drawing can improve complex reasoning, writing, and reading readiness, partly because the critical and creative faculties required to generate and appreciate art transfer cognitively to future learning experiences, and partly because the arts make learning fun: A student personally invested in his or her work will be far more likely to stick with it” (Edutopia). This strategy activates context clues and prior knowledge by allowing students to connect their drawings to concepts being learned to further develop vocabulary.

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