Tag Archives: SpotlightOnStrategiesSeries

Students in a science classroom.

Top Ten SOS in Science Classrooms

Top Ten SOS in Science Classrooms

The Spotlight on Strategies series is the perfect companion for science instruction. Budding scientists need opportunities to get hands-on through experimentation, analysis of experiment data, opportunities to synthesize multiple sources, and evaluate material they’re learning. The SOS provide creative and interactive ways to do all of these things!

Top Ten SOS: Primary Edition

Welcome to our special Top Ten series on SOS in the classroom. This month we’re putting our youngest learners in the spotlight by sharing how you can engage primary students in active learning. We’re excited to share adaptations to the Spotlight on Strategies series that have been successfully implemented in Kindergarten and 1st grade classrooms.  

SOS: 3-2-1 Pyramid

In order to effectively summarize information, students must learn to analyze it at a deep level. The 3-2-1 pyramid organizer helps scaffold students in learning how to make decisions about what information is extraneous and can be deleted or substituted, and what information is critical and necessary to understanding the topic.

SOS: Sticky Back

Listening, reading, and/or watching for key ideas and details is an important comprehension skill for students of all ages to master. Understanding what a media selection explicitly says allows a student to make inferences and take appropriate actions. The Sticky Back strategy encourages students to listen and observe beyond the obvious, reporting key ideas and details they observed -and hope their classmates did not!

SOS: DIY Reader’s Theater

Reader’s Theater is a fun and accessible way to bring dramatic presentation into your classroom. This technique helps your students understand what they read, demonstrate reading fluency, and work collaboratively. In DIY Reader’s Theater, students are write their own scripts from different types of fiction or non-fiction reading passages.

SOS: Three Questions

This strategy allows students the opportunity to ask three questions, leading them into their own learning through deeper investigation. Introduced by Trace Dominguez at DENSI 2015, this strategy reinforces the concept that when students generate their own questions about a story, text, problem, or topic, it piques student interest and gives purpose for reading or research thus driving learning through inquiry.

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