Archive for elearning

Election Day 2010

Woman Suffrage Headquarter in Cleveland, Ohio

 Exercise Your Right  to VOTE

Sometimes we need to remind our students, children and grandchildren that not everyone had the right to vote in this country when it was founded.  Originally the right to vote was a privilege given only to white men wealthy enough to own land. Men and women fought for the right to vote for all citizens regardless of race, religion and gender.

Our Grandmothers and/or Great-grandmothers who lived 90 years ago were the first group of woman able to vote. It was not until 1920 that women were granted the right to go the polls and vote. Search in Discovery under “Suffrage” and take some time to see how these women fought for all woman to vote. So, refresh my memory, why are not all woman voting this year? Why exactly? Carpool duties? Work? Your vote doesn’t matter? Raining? I hope not.

If you have children, nieces, nephews, or grandchildren, take at least one of them with you to  model how easy it is to vote and discuss that it is a right for all American citizens. As adults we must model how important it is to go out and vote.

View the Discovery Video “The Almost Painless Guide:Election Process”. You might consider showing a short segment to your students and take a minute to discuss Election Day.

HAPPY ELECTION DAY!!

 

 

Web 2.0’s top 1,000 List!

Found a great site through Twitter today

Web 2.0’s Top 1,000 List!

The list is broken down by categories i.e. Audio, Animation, Polls etc. A simple but interesting site. You can get lost for hours checking out the links. Happy exploring. http://www.web20links.net/

Ten Web 2.0 Things You Can Do in Ten Minutes

10 Things to doTEN WEB 2.0 THINGS YOU CAN DO IN TEN MINUTES –  the title caught my interest. I came across a video on You Tube that referenced the article and then searched for it. The author,

http://www.elearnmag.org/subpage.cfm?article=60-1&section=articles 

TEN WEB 2.0 THINGS YOU CAN DO IN TEN MINUTES TO BE A MORE SUCCESSFUL E-LEARNING PROFESSIONAL

The following list was inspired by eLearn Magazine Editor-in-Chief Lisa Neal’s blog post “Ten Things You Can Do in Ten Minutes To Be a More Successful e-learning Professional.” We’d like to offer the “Web 2.0 Edition” of Lisa’s list:

  1. Listen to a conference presentation. When you run across conference presentations while reading your RSS feeds (EDUCAUSE Connect is a prime source, as is OLDaily), save the conference site as a bookmark and revisit it to hear a presentation.
  2. Record a 10-minute presentation about something you are working on or learning about, either as audio (use Odeo) or video (use Ustream), and post it on your blog.
  3. Do a search on the title of your most recent post or on the title of the most recent thing you’ve read or thought about. Don’t just use Google search, use Google Blog Search and Google Image Search, Amazon, del.icio.us, Technorati, Slideshare, or Youtube. Scan the results and if you find something interesting, save it in del.icio.us to read later.
  4. Write a blog post or article describing something you’ve learned recently. It can be something you’ve read or culled from a meeting, conference notes (which you just capture on the fly using a text editor), or a link you’ve posted to del.icio.us. The trick here is to keep your writing activity to less than 10 minutes—make a point quickly and then click “submit.”
  5. Tidy your e-portfolio. For example, upload your slides to Slideshare and audio recordings to Odeo and embed the code in your presentation page. Or write a description and link to your latest publication. Or update your project list.
  6. Create a slide on Zoho. Just do one slide at a time; find an image using the Creative Commons licensed content on Flickr and a short bit of text from a source or yourself. Add this to your stick of prepared slides you use for your next talk or class.
  7. Find a blogger you currently read in your RSS reader and go to their website. Follow all the links to other blogs in their blogroll or feedroll, or which are referenced in their posts. Well, maybe not all the links, or it will take hours, not ten minutes.
  8. Write a comment on a blog post, article, or book written by an e-learning researcher or practitioner.
  9. Go to a website like Engadget, Metafilter, Digg, Mixx, Mashable, or Hotlinks and skip through the items. These sites produce much too much content to follow diligently, but are great for browsing and serendipitous discovery. If you find something interesting, write a short blog post about it or at least a comment.
  10. Catch up on one of your online games with a colleague—Scrabulous on Facebook or Backgammon on Yahoo. Or make a Lolcat. Or watch a Youtube video.

About the Author
Stephen Downes works with the E-Learning Research group of NRC’s Institute for Information Technology and is based in Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada. He spends his time working on learning object and related metadata, blogs, and blogging, RSS and content syndication, and raising cats.

Rain Rain and more Rain

whitehouse.jpgWhite House Rain Sept. 30, 2010  It has been raining heavy since last night in the Washington DC Metro Area.  Everyone came to work today wet. Children had indoor recess all over the school district. What a good time to go to Discovery Education and learn indoors! If you have set-up a Student Center for each of your students, this is a good time to allow them to explore Discovery. It is a safe place for them to explore and learn. If you have not set-up Student Centers for your students, you are missing a great way to use your Discovery Education Account and what a great way to spend a rainy indoor recess for students.

Carmella

iConnect to Home & Hospital Bount Students

Staying connected by TV April 29 and counting down to the Maryland Instructional Computing Conference MSET taking place in Baltimore on April 30th and May 1st. I am presenting on May 1st at the conference. The topic is “iConnect to Home and Hospital Bound Students” The session will cover what Prince George’s County Public Schools has done in the last year on keeping students connected to their teachers and classmates. We are using simple to professional level video conferencing tools. The simple tools are email, Instant messaging, websites and wikis. We are using Elluminate for virtual classrooms and Polycome for video conferencing. The teacher has video conferencing equipment in their room and the student can be connect live to the class room via the Internet at their home or in the hospital. Prince George’s County Public Schools services about 900 students a year who are home and/or hospital bound.

I will be posting the link to our presentation in a later post.

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