Monday Morning Ad Execs

     Game over! Let the second guessing begin! Except for Lori’s comment on the previous post, it looks like you’re going to let me do the talking. But feel free to chime in anytime. So here’s what I saw…
     First off, I have to agree with Lori. I liked the mouse in the Blockbuster commercial too. And if memory serves, the computer mouse got it’s name from Mickey’s little cousin.
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     Next, ya gotta love Oprah and David Letterman in love. What a surprise that was! And what a great example of a few simple shot angles. You can revisit their spot at CBS News Early Show “Smackdown” post mortem of the commercials, about 4 minutes in. Without giving much more away, it starts with a close-up, goes to a two-shot, and then backs up and finishes with a medium-long shot, all in ten seconds. Usually, we start with a long, establishing shot and then move in.
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     How about a comparison between Frito-Lay and Coke’s Black History Month tip of the hat? Both did a fine, low key job in two completely different ways. Frito-Lay used vignettes of a variety of African-American fans watching their favorite teams. I really liked the Bears fan hyperventilating (we had a few Irish-Americans doing that too). Coca-Cola went with an all text message (with some great piano) that depended on the viewer’s knowledge of history. I wonder if that started any discussions in family rooms. Just who was #42, anyhow?
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     E-Trade had two clever twists. One had bank employees donning masks and robbing their customers. The other was on what you can do with one (close-up) finger that ended discreetly with a no-shot of what you could do with THE finger to quit your job. Not a line you want your students to get too close to.
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     Finally (for now at least), what did you think of the “Amateur Bowl” of ads? Chevy had a contest for college students, but Doritos took it with their two homemade entries. I liked "Crash" done by a husband and wife team and a cameraman on roller blades. It is a simple combination of close-up and reaction shots with just a few medium-long shots. Supposedly, the total cost was just $12.50.
     I used http://sports.aol.com/nfl/superbowlads to study the commercials.

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