DEN Trend Report: 3/2/16

DEN Trend Report FeaturedLooking to learn more about what’s trending in education?!? Here’s a recap of this week’s news. Let us know what you think about this week’s news in the comments below.

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STEM Teacher Prep Gets New Commitments (THE Journal)
Dian Schaffhauser
The White House goal of training or retraining 100,000 teachers in STEM subjects by 2021 is gaining momentum. 100Kin10, an organization dedicated to achieving this end, just announced 49 new partners, including Texas A&M University and Washington University in St. Louis, among other businesses, non-profits, foundations and academic institutions working on the mission.

The 100Kin10 coalition formed in 2011 following a State of the Union address in which President Obama called for the preparation of “100,000 new teachers in the fields of science and technology and engineering and math.”

Does Coding Count as a Foreign Language? (The Atlantic)
Natalie Gross
Spanish. French. German. Computer coding. Are they the same?

This question is at the center of a debate in Florida, where legislators are currently considering a bill that would require high schools to offer computer coding as a foreign-language credit.

The bill is sponsored by the former Yahoo executive and democratic state senator Jeremy Ring, who sees coding as its own unique language. But some argue the skill doesn’t offer the value of spoken-language training and might be a better fit for the STEM disciplines.

NEW FRONTIERS IN BLENDED LEARNING (Tech & Learning)
By Tara Smith
The definition of blended learning continues to shift as technology opens up new possibilities and teachers embrace new instructional models. Lauren Quient, innovation manager for KIPP LA, says, “Teachers have always wanted students to have a personalized learning experience, and now technology has evolved to the point where that’s possible.” In districts large and small, the growing consensus seems to be that we’re at the frontier of a new age for teachers and learners. Here are some of their stories.

WEP 0027: Expanding Your Educational Impact (Wired Educator)
By Kelly Croy
Kelly interviews Andy Losik about his new book, Stay in the Game, sharing his knowledge of technology annually on a local television news program, working with amazing corporations focused on helping education, and providing quality professional development for educators. Andy and Kelly also discuss being the all-around “helpful tech guy,” a role many wired educators know very well. Andy is a great teacher, a great guy, and has really expanded his impact as an educator. This is a great interview for all educators. You will be inspired to expand your classroom and discover many ways to make an even bigger impact and improve your lifestyle.

The 4 Essential Elements of Any Successful One-to-One Program (eSchool News)
By Alexandra Ito
Not all successful one-to-one programs are alike. But they do share some common ground
As more and more schools and districts set goals to provide one-to-one access to technology to students to meet teaching and learning goals, district and school leaders are faced with the task of planning and implementing technology resources at levels that they might not have experienced in the past. My district, Santa Ana Unified (SAUSD), is increasing access to students through a program called “Access for All,” a well-received iPad and Chromebook initiative. Through this experience, we have developed a model for planning and implementation. Here’s how we got started.

Do Kids Learn More When They Trade in Composition Books for iPads? (The Washington Post)
By Donna St. George
One winter morning, Spark Matsunaga Elementary School teacher Greta Fitch asks her fourth-graders to consider the world outside their door — specifically, the businesses that line their suburban streets. What sorts of stores and services and restaurants are there? Is anything missing?

On each desk is a Chromebook, a lightweight laptop that students use to search Germantown, Md., using Google Maps as if they were driving the streets. Fitch says that in coming days she will ask the students to put themselves in the shoes of the diverse town’s residents. What businesses might they want? she asks. What do they not see?

Testing for Joy and Grit? Schools Nationwide Push to Measure Students’ Emotional Skills (The New York Times)
Kate Zernike
SAN FRANCISCO — The fifth graders in Jade Cooney’s classroom compete against a kitchen timer during lessons to see how long they can sustain good behavior — raising hands, disagreeing respectfully and looking one another in the eye — without losing time to insults or side conversations.

As reward for minutes without misconduct, they win prizes like 20 seconds to kick their feet up on their desks or to play rock-paper-scissors. And starting this year, their school and schools in eight other California districts will test students on how well they have learned the kind of skills like self-control and conscientiousness that the games aim to cultivate — ones that might be described as everything you should have learned in kindergarten but are still reading self-help books to master in middle age.

 

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